An analysis of the association between the supply demand and price changes as a result of recent and

The basic theory states that the "market mechanism" of supply and demand will result in an equilibrium price for a good or service such that there will be equilibrium between the cost of the good to society as well as the benefit of the good to consumers. Economists who believe in an infallible market believe that the market will determine the optimum output of all goods, so long as the costs and benefits of the goods are "internalized" to the market, and prices are left free to fluctuate. Supply The supply and demand curves are both graphed with quantity "Q" on the "X" axis and price "P" on the "Y" axis. The supply curve shows the relationship between the quantity of a good that producers are willing to sell at a price.

An analysis of the association between the supply demand and price changes as a result of recent and

This analysis quantifies future demand and supply curves in order to predict future prices When is it useful? This analysis is most useful when you need to forecast in a commodity industry.

This example is for intraday spot pricing for electricity. Imagine a pool, where individual power plants can bid their capacity at different prices; these bids are accepted in order from the cheapest to the highest until all the demand is served.

Hydro plants have very low marginal costs — mostly in maintenance and distribution. They will bid very low to stay operational.

Although the capital and operating costs of these plants is huge, the marginal cost of capacity is small — all that is used is the Uranium fuel. So these plants will stay running even at very low demand.

An analysis of the association between the supply demand and price changes as a result of recent and

Coal power stations are next in marginal cost. Gas power generation will bid higher still. It has higher marginal cost that coal, because gas is a more expensive fuel.

Featuring...

However, the fully loaded cost of generation will be less than coal, so most of the new capacity is likely to be added at this point in the supply curve. Oil is an expensive fuel to use for power generation. This analysis shows bio fuels as still not competitive with oil.

This may change as technology improves and the subsidy regime changes. On the demand side, we can see that most of the demand in inelastic. Peak electricity demand equals GW. The more efficient oil power stations are operating, they are the price setting capacity.

Bio-fuel powered generation capacity will still lie dormant while there are still interruptable customers to switch off. If new nuclear generation capacity was built, it would enter at the low cost end of the supply curve, shifting it to the right and depressing electricity prices at all price points [Practical note: This analysis is an abstraction of the real price-setting mechanism.

In practice, supply and demand are frequently tied up in long term supply agreements. The analysis requires a combination of research, model building and judgement. In the short term, capacity is inelastic — no new capacity can be introduced.

In order to flex production therefore, all companies can do is to decide whether to run or not. A key assumption is made: Plants will price down to their marginal cash cost.

Forget the fixed costs and capital invested — the business owner who is a price taker only has one decision to make — do I run or not?

They are better off running if price is above marginal cost. This assumption is valid in fragmented, highly competitive markets — it is not true under oligopoly or markets with cartels operating. In order to construct the current supply curve, you need to construct a database of all current capacity, together with the marginal cost of running that capacity.

It is impossible to calculate this for every plant — to fill in the gaps, assumptions are required — for example, similar size plants with similar technology and management can be assumed to have similar operating costs.

It is important to include the construction leadtimeswhich are different for every industry. What is the typical length of time between the decision to increase capacity to when it is fully operational?

Steadily more uncertain expansions should be added to the model. For future expansions, two different costs are needed — the marginal cost as above and the fully loaded cost.Supply and demand is perhaps one of the most fundamental concepts of economics and it is the backbone of a market economy.

Demand refers to how much (quantity) of a product or service is desired by buyers. The quantity demanded is the amount of a product people are willing to buy at a certain price; the relationship between price and quantity . Supply. The supply and demand curves are both graphed with quantity "Q" on the "X" axis and price "P" on the "Y" axis.

The supply curve shows the relationship between the quantity of a good that producers are willing to sell at a price.

Here's an example of the supply and demand curves, with an equilibrium price of $3, which is at the intersection of the supply and demand curves. At a price of $3, consumers will demand and. It will use graphical analysis to analyze demand, supply, determination of the market price, and how markets adjust to dynamic change.

Let’s consider how markets will adjust to various changes that alter demand and supply. We will begin by focusing on changes in demand. Demand, Supply, and Market Price.

Demand Supply Analysis

Production Costs, Demand, and Competition Small changes in supply and/or demand can greatly affect the prices that are paid for commodities (where demand tends to be very inelastic) and for supplies needed. Some changes may be relatively predictable—e.g., (based on a regression analysis of price as a function of time), we see that.

Supply and Demand: The price P of a product is determined by a balance between production at each price (supply S) and the desires of those with purchasing power at each price (demand D).

The diagram shows a positive shift in demand from D1 to D2, resulting .

Using the Supply-and-Demand Framework